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Tips on Stingless Beekeeping
by Australian Beekeepers
(Volumes 2 and 3)


Why These Booklets?
Contents of Tips (Volume 2)

Contents of Tips (Volume 3)



John Klump's cross-sectional diagram
of his heater under a KITH hive
(From: Tips on Stingless Beekeeping...
Volume 2)
Heater under KITH hive


Why These Booklets were Written

Thousands of Australians are discovering the delights of keeping stingless native bees in their backyards. These miniature black bees are fascinating, safe and easy to look after. They can be great pollinators of the vegie garden and in warmer areas they can supply a taste of their tangy 'sugarbag' honey. Australian beekeepers are developing many creative techniques for keeping these unique bees.

New Beekeeping Techniques Needed

Stingless bees also have the potential to make a significant contribution to Australian agriculture in crop pollination and niche honey production. However, before stingless bees can be efficiently used on a commercial basis, some advanced beekeeping techniques will be needed.

For example:
- standardised hive designs for crop pollination and production
- selective breeding of vigorous, productive strains
- queen bee breeding
- artificial feeding and temperature control to speed hive propagation
- predator control
- techniques for setting up hives in a crop or on a honey flow
- prevention of hive theft

120 Beekeepers Come to the Rescue

To promote the development of all these important beekeeping techniques, the Australian Native Bee Research Centre conducted the Stingless Beekeeping Survey 2000. Over 120 Australian beekeepers sent in observations, suggestions, designs and photographs on a wide range of topics from how to find nests to how to harvest honey.


Alan Waters' honey feeder using a plastic 'egg' for a reservoir
(From: Tips on Stingless Beekeeping...
Volume 3)
Honey Feeder


Beekeeper Interviews

To add to this material the Australian Native Bee Research Centre went on native bee safari to Queensland in September 2001 and interviewed many experienced beekeepers on these important subjects.

Such a large amount of valuable information was gathered that we decided to produce two new volumes of Tips on Stingless Beekeeping by Australian Beekeepers.



Contents of Tips on Stingless Beekeeping by Australian Beekeepers (Volume 2)

More tips from 120 Australian beekeepers on:

  • Finding nests:
    -- Ideal weather conditions
    -- Best time of day
    -- Which trees to search
    -- Look for flying bees
    -- Other tell tale signs
    -- Nests in a heap of timber
  • Boxing Austroplebeia nests
  • Siting hives
  • Hive boxes in current use
  • Insulating hives:
    -- Timber thickness
    -- Foam covers
  • Avoiding overheating of hives
  • New box designs:
    -- For honey harvesting
    -- For Austroplebeia nests
    -- A cattleproof design
    -- Cylindrical designs
  • Experimental heated hive designs
  • Honey harvesting techniques

Price: $Aust 10.00 plus postage & handling within Australia.


If you would like to order, click here.


Contents of Tips on Stingless Beekeeping by Australian Beekeepers (Volume 3)

Still more tips from 120 Australian beekeepers on:

  • Strengthening Hives:
    -- Increasing bee numbers
    -- Boosting a hive's defences
    -- Providing warmth and shelter
    -- Supplementary feeders
    -- Artificial honeypot systems
  • Controlling Predators:
    -- Ants
    -- Spiders
    -- Phorid flies
    -- Syrphid flies
    -- Cane toads
    -- Lizards
    -- Birds
  • Dealing with Torelliana resin
  • Preventing fighting swarms
  • Causes of hive death
  • Crop pollination
  • Preventing hive theft
  • Breeding queen bees

Price: $Aust 10.00 plus postage & handling within Australia.

If you would like to order, click here.


© 1997-2012 Australian Native Bee Research Centre
PO Box 74, North Richmond NSW 2754, Australia

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